freedomforwhales:

Bryde’s Whale

  • The Bryde’s whale (pronounced “broo-dess”), is named after Johan Bryde who helped build the first whaling factory in Durban, South Africa in 1909. Sometimes known, appropriately, as the “tropical whale”, this is the only baleen whale species that lives all year-round in warmer waters near the equator.
  • The Bryde’s whale has three parallel ridges on the top of its head. It has between 40 and 70 throat pleats which allow its mouth to expand when feeding. As with some of the other baleen whales, the Bryde’s whale primarily eats schooling fish and sometimes krill and other planktonic crustaceans. 
  • Sometimes inquisitive, the Bryde’s whale can be seen approaching or swimming alongside boats. It has irregular breathing patterns, and will often blow four to seven thin, hazy spouts, followed by a dive, usually about two minutes long, although it is capable of staying below the surface for longer. 
  • There are both offshore and coastal-dwelling groups, and a dwarf type of Bryde’s whale has recently been recognised around the Solomon Islands. Japanese whalers started hunting Bryde’s whales again in 2000 when 43 were killed in the Northwest Pacific for so-called “scientific research”. Bryde’s whales are also threatened by noise and chemical pollution.

Source

rhamphotheca:

SeaWorld is 50 years old and we have 50 good reasons NOT to go there!No. 33:  In the wild, the mean life expectancy of orcas is 30 years for males and 50 for females. While a very small number of captive whales has achieved these average life spans, most die in their teens and 20s and none have come anywhere close to the estimated maximum life spans of 60-70 years for males and 80-90 for females. Please go to http://uk.whales.org/Wdc-in-action/ending-captive-cruelty to support our fight against captivity!

The problem with this though is is that even if the first ever captured whales were still alive, they wouldn’t have reached the “estimated maximum life spans”. Shamu, for example, would be ~53 years old if still alive today and the first orca captured, Wanda, would be ~60. Namu would be closer to the ages stated above at ~58 (based on youngest estimate for his capture age). [All ages based on dates from orcahome]I’m not trying to argue that the average age at death isn’t lower in captivity, but making comparisons with maximum lifespans makes no sense when the first orca was captured only 53 years ago, 27 years short of the lowest stated maximum lifespan for females.

rhamphotheca:

SeaWorld is 50 years old and we have 50 good reasons NOT to go there!

No. 33:  In the wild, the mean life expectancy of orcas is 30 years for males and 50 for females. While a very small number of captive whales has achieved these average life spans, most die in their teens and 20s and none have come anywhere close to the estimated maximum life spans of 60-70 years for males and 80-90 for females.

Please go to http://uk.whales.org/
Wdc-in-action/ending-captive-cruelty to support our fight against captivity!

The problem with this though is is that even if the first ever captured whales were still alive, they wouldn’t have reached the “estimated maximum life spans”. Shamu, for example, would be ~53 years old if still alive today and the first orca captured, Wanda, would be ~60. Namu would be closer to the ages stated above at ~58 (based on youngest estimate for his capture age). [All ages based on dates from orcahome]

I’m not trying to argue that the average age at death isn’t lower in captivity, but making comparisons with maximum lifespans makes no sense when the first orca was captured only 53 years ago, 27 years short of the lowest stated maximum lifespan for females.

theincredibleorca:

From Erich Hoyt’s “Orca: The Whale Called Killer”. Michael Bigg believed this pod may have had a genetically weak dorsal fin structure.

theincredibleorca:

From Erich Hoyt’s “Orca: The Whale Called Killer”. Michael Bigg believed this pod may have had a genetically weak dorsal fin structure.

tagged → #interesting #orca
orcasorcas:

Photo and caption by  Isabelle Dupre 
Back flip of a wild orca (Orcinus orca) in the waters off Norway. This young female did the same breach three times close to our boat. I have never ever seen a breach like that from a wild orca. I cannot recall any picture taken of such a breach in the wild. The second time she breached, I was able to capture the reflection of the female on the still water of the sea which was like a mirror. It is one of my best memories in my photographing experience.
Location: Norway - Vesteralen Islands - Offshore

orcasorcas:

Photo and caption by Isabelle Dupre

Back flip of a wild orca (Orcinus orca) in the waters off Norway. This young female did the same breach three times close to our boat. I have never ever seen a breach like that from a wild orca. I cannot recall any picture taken of such a breach in the wild. The second time she breached, I was able to capture the reflection of the female on the still water of the sea which was like a mirror. It is one of my best memories in my photographing experience.

Location: Norway - Vesteralen Islands - Offshore

tagged → #this is crazy! #noice #orca
Anonymous asked: I'm writing a pro-captivity paper and I'd love it if you'd educate me on stereotypical behaviors, loud music/fireworks, cetacean rights, and anything else you have comments on. Thanks! :)

Hey anon :)

I’d be happy to help but I’m just wondering what sort of thing you are after? My opinions or facts or my observations? Let me know :)

Keiko

Gifs that didn’t quite fit into the other post.

dreams-of-whales:

Whale ‘group hug’. Taken from shore yesterday evening at Lime Kiln.

dreams-of-whales:

Whale ‘group hug’. Taken from shore yesterday evening at Lime Kiln.

tagged → #huggggggggssss #orca
tagged → #orca #kayla

My inbox is still being a pile of crap so if you’ve sent me a message recently and I haven’t replied that’ll be why. Sorry!

tagged → #blog stuff #non cetacean

Free Willy - Audition