corkyii:

luckynugget said: Doesn’t ham mean cute? Or am I way off?

It means someone who LOVES attention and loves performing for attention

and I’ve seen a lot of people describe the whales like that and maybe they think it means cute too but it doesn’t and it makes my stomach kind of turn

Ooooh. Thanks for the clarification :) I always thought it just meant cute and used it as such. Oops.

lusitanoqueen asked: you should ask an "educator" why the whales arent given live fish. i'm actually genuinely curious. although they may not know

derangedhyena-delphinidae:

cetuscetus:

corkyii:

freedomforwhales:

stumpytheorca:

b3n3aththesurfac3:

I’ll try my best! :)

They have answered this one before and I remember crying with laughter/generally shocked as part of the reply included ‘its not fair to the fish’
X

"How dare you put living fish in these tanks against their will where they have no escape from the orcas!" The trainer says as orcas who were put in tanks against their will where they have no escape from humans swim their laps around the pool.

I always assumed they said its cruel for the fish because of the chlorine?? Like they’d die anyway or can fish live in chlorine??

That’s always what I thought but I’m probably wrong?

I think it’s literally just an ethical thing, for the same reason (I believe) you can’t buy live mice from a pet shop if you intend on feeding them to a snake.

Money probably plays an issue too, as I would imagine it would be more costly to ship and store live fish than frozen ones.

You can buy live mice (and fish) for feeding though… (in the US, I believe it’s banned in the UK?)

Don’t you think they could/should bring fish in at least occasionally, as a treat/something different? Regardless of the cost? That’s the most natural sort of stimulation they could possibly provide the whales, and they just… don’t. :(

(The ethics argument prior posited by that trainer on that video sort of blows my mind.) 

Oh definitely I’d like to see them use live fish. I wasn’t trying to defend it just suggest reasons why it is how it is.

lusitanoqueen asked: you should ask an "educator" why the whales arent given live fish. i'm actually genuinely curious. although they may not know

corkyii:

freedomforwhales:

stumpytheorca:

b3n3aththesurfac3:

I’ll try my best! :)

They have answered this one before and I remember crying with laughter/generally shocked as part of the reply included ‘its not fair to the fish’
X

"How dare you put living fish in these tanks against their will where they have no escape from the orcas!" The trainer says as orcas who were put in tanks against their will where they have no escape from humans swim their laps around the pool.

I always assumed they said its cruel for the fish because of the chlorine?? Like they’d die anyway or can fish live in chlorine??

That’s always what I thought but I’m probably wrong?

I think it’s literally just an ethical thing, for the same reason (I believe) you can’t buy live mice from a pet shop if you intend on feeding them to a snake.

Money probably plays an issue too, as I would imagine it would be more costly to ship and store live fish than frozen ones.

scottish-orca:

Scottish- Orca
Northern Isles Pod, In scottish stormy seas.
X

tagged → #orca

tokitaee:

coffeeandkudzu:

freethecetaceans:

orcadiva:

fake-zolology:

Despite numerous attempts with animals ranging from great apes to poodles, there has only ever been one animal truly taught to read. He was a performing orca named Hyak who lived at the Vancouver Aquarium for nearly 20 years. His lessons in reading comprehension started off as an accident. Dirk McKimmel, the senior trainer at the aquarium, found that the whale would often stop by the underwater viewing window that led into his office as he sat reading. He began to show the maturing 5,000 lb animal the pictures in his books and was quite startled by how interested he seemed to be. Thinking the whale simply enjoyed the novel visual stimulation, he soon took the books up to the pool ledge and began reading out loud as he showed the whale the pictures. This continued for about ten years but no one thought Hyak had any actual comprehension of the book he was being read. 

One day in 1980, a new cetologist at the aquarium began to question what was really going on in these sessions. In a highly controlled study, he began to ask the whale questions about the books. 

On that fateful day, the first thing we did was take Hyak to the smaller side pool in his aquarium, away from his tank mates. He was used to this as we often moved him in order to perform our behavioral experiments, however this time instead of asking him if an image on a screen was round or square as per usual, we asked him if Harold had indeed drawn the moon with his purple crayon. To our great surprise, Hyak distinctly nodded “yes.” We continued on with these studies for several weeks and found that Hyak answered our questions with a 96% accuracy rate on numerous different books McKimmel had been reading him. I decided to take it a step farther, holding books up to Hyak’s window without reading aloud to him. At first it felt a bit silly but soon I noticed when he wanted the page flipped, he would look up and meet my gaze, as though impatient with me. The very next week we attempted to test Hyak’s reading comprehension on this new book he had been reading and discovered he could answer every question about “the Emperor’s New Clothes” perfectly. 

[My Life with Whales- Nicholas Willens, 1995] 

Willen’s 1989 report on Hyak in Animal Cognition was quickly discredited as the idea of a reading whale appeared simply ludicrous. However recent research into the study has found no factual errors and many are arguing the paper should be taken seriously. Mary Kyles, a senior research scientist at the Whale and Dolphin Conservation society was recorded saying "As it has been proven that orcas are highly linguistic and speak in a language of their own, a whale in captivity with little to do but listen to his trainer read books could easily pick up the skill."

This story does not end well for poor Hyak. Defeated, both Willens and McKimmel stopped providing Hyak with reading material and he sadly passed away in 1991. Though he may be gone, his legacy lives on in the important contributions he made to our understanding of the animal mind and just what it is capable of. 

sources: [x] [x] [x]

This is why I love orcas. Their intelligence is just mind blowing.

Dude holy shit

I love Hyak. :’( The gif of him going up, taking a breath, and coming down to put his eye up to the glass and look at the book is one of my favorites.

REQUESTING THAT GIF IF ANYONE HAS IT! I haven’t seen it!

Casual reminder that the name of the blog that originally posted this is “fake-zolology”.

kyrrahaf:

Grace at Sunset on Flickr.
Kayla, taken on 5/8/14. 
Do not repost here or on any other media without credit. Do not remove my watermark. Thank you! 

kyrrahaf:

Grace at Sunset on Flickr.

Kayla, taken on 5/8/14. 

Do not repost here or on any other media without credit. Do not remove my watermark. Thank you! 

tagged → #orkid #orca
question

kyrrahaf:

makaiooo:

how the hell do you pronounce ikaikas name?
like eye-ka-ee-kuh? eye-ka-eye-ka?
who the hell names these whales

Eee-kai-kuh is how I say it, idr how it’s supposed to be said. |D

Trainers at San Diego pronounce it “eye-kai-ka” but I’ve also been told that’s wrong and it’s supposed to be “ee-kai-ka” so ??

freedomforwhales:

Bryde’s Whale

  • The Bryde’s whale (pronounced “broo-dess”), is named after Johan Bryde who helped build the first whaling factory in Durban, South Africa in 1909. Sometimes known, appropriately, as the “tropical whale”, this is the only baleen whale species that lives all year-round in warmer waters near the equator.
  • The Bryde’s whale has three parallel ridges on the top of its head. It has between 40 and 70 throat pleats which allow its mouth to expand when feeding. As with some of the other baleen whales, the Bryde’s whale primarily eats schooling fish and sometimes krill and other planktonic crustaceans. 
  • Sometimes inquisitive, the Bryde’s whale can be seen approaching or swimming alongside boats. It has irregular breathing patterns, and will often blow four to seven thin, hazy spouts, followed by a dive, usually about two minutes long, although it is capable of staying below the surface for longer. 
  • There are both offshore and coastal-dwelling groups, and a dwarf type of Bryde’s whale has recently been recognised around the Solomon Islands. Japanese whalers started hunting Bryde’s whales again in 2000 when 43 were killed in the Northwest Pacific for so-called “scientific research”. Bryde’s whales are also threatened by noise and chemical pollution.

Source

rhamphotheca:

SeaWorld is 50 years old and we have 50 good reasons NOT to go there!No. 33:  In the wild, the mean life expectancy of orcas is 30 years for males and 50 for females. While a very small number of captive whales has achieved these average life spans, most die in their teens and 20s and none have come anywhere close to the estimated maximum life spans of 60-70 years for males and 80-90 for females. Please go to http://uk.whales.org/Wdc-in-action/ending-captive-cruelty to support our fight against captivity!

The problem with this though is is that even if the first ever captured whales were still alive, they wouldn’t have reached the “estimated maximum life spans”. Shamu, for example, would be ~53 years old if still alive today and the first orca captured, Wanda, would be ~60. Namu would be closer to the ages stated above at ~58 (based on youngest estimate for his capture age). [All ages based on dates from orcahome]I’m not trying to argue that the average age at death isn’t lower in captivity, but making comparisons with maximum lifespans makes no sense when the first orca was captured only 53 years ago, 27 years short of the lowest stated maximum lifespan for females.

rhamphotheca:

SeaWorld is 50 years old and we have 50 good reasons NOT to go there!

No. 33:  In the wild, the mean life expectancy of orcas is 30 years for males and 50 for females. While a very small number of captive whales has achieved these average life spans, most die in their teens and 20s and none have come anywhere close to the estimated maximum life spans of 60-70 years for males and 80-90 for females.

Please go to http://uk.whales.org/
Wdc-in-action/ending-captive-cruelty to support our fight against captivity!

The problem with this though is is that even if the first ever captured whales were still alive, they wouldn’t have reached the “estimated maximum life spans”. Shamu, for example, would be ~53 years old if still alive today and the first orca captured, Wanda, would be ~60. Namu would be closer to the ages stated above at ~58 (based on youngest estimate for his capture age). [All ages based on dates from orcahome]

I’m not trying to argue that the average age at death isn’t lower in captivity, but making comparisons with maximum lifespans makes no sense when the first orca was captured only 53 years ago, 27 years short of the lowest stated maximum lifespan for females.